I ask this question of most of my clients when we start working together.

Why you, and not the next guy?

The answer will tell me what is important to the client. Then, as per my modus operandi,  I proceed to ask for proof, in order to test the assumptions made by the business owner.

A point of differentiation must be genuine to the business, in terms of being realistic in scope, resources and output. To ensure my clients are building a realistic point of differentiation, I focus first of all on two main areas.

Business Standards

Strong differentiation – that is based on more than price – means a certain quality standard. The first thing I do is brainstorm with my client about how quality is imagined and defined in their business.

There are a variety of ways to set a quality standard, it can be based on the product, the service, or both. What is important is that the business owner or managers have a firm definition of their quality standard. We can then identify areas in the business and service where those standards can shine, to help their brand be known for those qualities.

Service Standards

If you had a loyalty club, what would it comprise? How would your club members differ from your regular clients? And what would attract people to want your loyalty card?

The next step is a focus on the client. I want to know not just who the client is, but how they define quality, what more they want from their providers and how they react when the seller is no longer in the room.

Why do people buy from you?

Solid Differentiation coupled with effective messaging will mean the difference between business growth and echo chambers. With the right definition, a business can attract the right clients and sell more effectively, increasing overall numbers.

 

Would you like a workshop for your management team to help define your Differentiation? Contact me to discuss details.